Collections

Barnsley's museum and archive collections include fine and decorative art, social and industrial history, archaeology, archival documents and photographs, local studies literature and sound and film. 

If you would like to make an enquiry about the collections, please email artsmuseumsandarchives@barnsley.gov.uk

 

Showing 1 to 10 of 60

Cooper Gallery

Hurricane Before St Malo

Hurricane Before St Malo in oil on canvas by Eugene Isabey (1803-1886), Cooper Bequest.

Cannon Hall

Ceramic Vase

'Cannon Hall' ceramic vase made by Sian Leeper for Moorcroft, 2007

Worsbrough Mill

Mill machinery, 2013

Miller Terry controls the millstones using technology which has changed little for hundreds of years.

Cooper Gallery

Peggy Airey

Peggy Airey in oil on canvas by Abel Hold (1815-1896), Fox Bequest.

Elsecar

The Girl Pat

Many remember the rowing boat that was set up on the reservoir in the 1940s.

Elsecar

Rows and Rows

Follow Wath Road and watch how the village expanded, with rows of cottages built end on end.

Cannon Hall

Pewter centrepiece

Pewter centrepiece made by Württembergische Metallwarenfabrik, c. 1895

Experience Barnsley

Glass epergne

Glass epergne made by Wood Brothers for the 1851 Great Exhibition in London

Elsecar

Working in the New Yard

Thousands have worked in the workshops, offices and ironworks that are now packed with visitors and shops.

Experience Barnsley

PRISONER OF WAR MESS TIN, 1942

Frank Hadfield was a gunner in the Royal Artillery and was taken prisoner of war on 15th February 1942 in Singapore where he entered a Japanese camp for three years. He was treated very badly; beaten, tortured and starved. He was seventeen stone when he left and six and half when he returned. Frank never should have gone to the Far East, he was destined for Iceland but their ship from Liverpool was given the wrong orders. As they arrived they were ordered to surrender and taken in cattle trucks to camps. He was made to work on the railways and kept a diary of events throughout the war. Some entries are very brief, as being caught writing his diary was almost certain death. This mess tin was carved by Frank with a nail during his time as a prisoner of war. You can see his name, number and regiment. He was released on 16th August 1945 and put on the first ship back to Southampton, arriving in October. He spent nine months recovering in hospital and suffered all his life with the terrible memories. He lived until 76 years old and worked at brickworks at Monk Bretton Colliery when he returned to Barnsley. Photo © Norman Taylor